CAMRA singles out five outstanding inns

Five inns have been singled out by the Campaign for Real Ale from across the UK, including three chosen as the best pubs to visit for any history buff, to mark the close of its ‘Summer of Pub’ campaign. The inns comprise:

Five inns have been singled out by the Campaign for Real Ale from across the UK, including three chosen as the best pubs to visit for any history buff, to mark the close of its ‘Summer of Pub’ campaign. The inns comprise:

Three Stags Head Inn, Wardlow Mires near Tideswell

The inn is described as something of a legendary rural pub which is featured in CAMRA’s National Inventory of unspoilt pub interiors. There are two small rooms with real fireplaces, usually with dogs in front of the door.

Trent Bridge Inn, Nottingham 

Following a costly refurbishment by JD Wetherspoon, this prominent Victorian corner pub reopened in 2011 to much acclaim. The interior comprises several interconnected, warm wood-panelled rooms filled with cosy booths, comfy sofas, an open fireplace and an array of mainly cricket-themed sporting memorabilia.

Victoria Inn, Durham 

A warm and welcoming Grade II listed Victorian inn that has remained almost unaltered since it was built in 1899. The quaint decor, coal fires, cosy snug and a genuine Victorian cash drawer help create an old-world feel.

George & Dragon, Hudswell

At the heart of the village, this homely multi-roomed country inn was CAMRA National Pub of the Year for 2016 and has been Champion Pub of Yorkshire several times. A pleasant walk from Richmond (if you don’t mind the 300+ steps!) brings you to the pub’s large beer terrace with fantastic panoramic views over the Swale valley. Rescued by the community in 2010 and refurbished, it boasts its own library, shop, allotments and other community facilities as well as food and drink. Beers are mostly from Yorkshire breweries and a dark ale is always available, often Rudgate Ruby Mild.

Bridge Inn, Peebles

Representing Scotland & Northern Ireland, the Bridge Inn is described as a cheerful, welcoming, town-centre local which is also known locally as ‘the Trust’. The mosaic entrance floor shows it was once the Tweedside Inn. It has a bright, comfortable bar which is decorated with jugs, bottles, pictures of old Peebles and displays relating to outdoor pursuits. There’s a cosy corner with a log burner and a small room to the rear. The sun trap patio overlooks the river and hills beyond. 

Ben Wilkinson, CAMRA’s National Director said: “Pubs are often at the heart of local history, but these pubs all demonstrate our nation’s rich cultural heritage in a particularly interesting and unique way”

While most people value the role community pubs play, not everyone is aware of the huge financial pressures that they face and the threats to their survival. Our Summer of Pub campaign aims to show what pubs have to offer and remind people how important the great British pub is to communities. From special screenings of the Women’s World Cup to comedy evenings, beer tastings or special talks, pubs have pulled out all the stops to celebrate this summer and provide something for everyone.